Cover Letter Etiquette | Military.com

Think of the cover letter as your resume’s cheerleading section. To make the best impression, follow these etiquette rules.

Source: Cover Letter Etiquette | Military.com

Advertisements

4 Ways to Make Writing Cover Letters Suck Less

If there’s one thing that all job seekers have in common, it’s that they hate writing cover letters. With a passion. But why? It’s not like they’re very long. And when you really think about it, they’re not that difficult . But something about that step between the resume and interview gets people really, really irritated. In fact, people ask us all the time: Is there any way to make writing cover letters suck less? Well actually, there is—in fact, depending on what your cover letter pain point is, there are several. So, take a deep breath, relax, and try one of these ideas for making the process a little bit better.

Source: 4 Ways to Make Writing Cover Letters Suck Less

Should I Mention My Disability In My Resume Or Cover Letter? | Ask Vicki

In this answer on Quora, Monster career expert Vicki Salemi explains when it’s necessary—and when it’s not—to disclose personal information.

A. There’s no need to mention your disability on your resume or cover letter. The only time when you may want to mention your disability, such as hearing loss, is if the job you’re pursuing is relevant to your hearing loss and the employer will need to make reasonable accommodations for you as a result.

In the instance of hearing loss, let’s say you’re pursuing a job where you’re on the phone all day long, translating conference calls dictated in French. Hearing is an essential part of the job. But during a job interview, it’s illegal for the hiring company to ask (and discriminate against you) if you have any disabilities. They may, however, ask if you’re able to perform functions of the position with or without accommodation.

What’s an accommodation, you ask? According to the Americans with Disabilities Act, employers must provide reasonable accommodations to qualified employees with disabilities, unless doing that would result in an undue hardship.

So, back to the resume and cover letter: You don’t need to mention your disability. Remember, your resume and cover letter are simply marketing tools that highlight your skills and experiences relevant to the job you’re applying for.

Source: Should I Mention My Disability In My Resume Or Cover Letter? | Ask Vicki